CLASS
The Moveable Feast offers monthly luncheons featuring presenters on a broad range of cultural topics (music, art, drama, history, and some literature, mostly by local and CLASS-published authors). Each is individually priced. Email [email protected] or call 843-235-9600 for more information. Click here to register online!

CLASS

Wednesday 06/05/2024 at 11:00 AM
Caroline Cleveland
(When Cicadas Cry) at The Village House, Litchfield
As the founding partner of the Charleston law firm Cleveland & Conley, LLC, Caroline Cleveland represents private and public employers, including law enforcement. A native South Carolinian, she inevitably writes from a Southern perspective. She gravitates – both as a writer and a reader – toward mystery and suspense, unable to resist a character with a dark secret. In this stunning debut by a South Carolina attorney, Zach Stander, a lawyer with a past, and Addie Stone, his indomitable detective and lover, find themselves entangled in secrets, lies, and murder in a small Southern town. A high-profile murder case—A white woman has been bludgeoned to death with an altar cross in a rural church on Cicada Road in Walterboro, South Carolina. Sam Jenkins, a Black man, is found covered in blood, kneeling over the body. In a state already roiling with racial tension, this is not only a murder case, but a powder keg. A haunting cold case—Two young women are murdered on quiet Edisto Beach, an hour southeast of Walterboro, and the killer disappears without a trace. Thirty-four years later the mystery remains unsolved. Could there be a connection to Stander's case? A killer who's watching - Stander takes on Jenkins' defense, but he's up against a formidable solicitor with powerful allies. Worse, his client is hiding a bombshell secret. When Addie Stone reopens the cold case, she discovers more long-buried secrets in this small town. Would someone kill again to keep them? Ideal for fans of mystery, suspense, and thrillers in the vein of Karin Slaughter's "Pretty Girls" and Stacy Willingham's "A Flicker in the Dark," as well as for readers who followed the high-profile Murdaugh murder trial, held in the same small town as in "When Cicadas Cry."
$35
CLASS
Tuesday 06/11/2024 at 11:00 AM
Zackary Vernon
(Our Bodies Electric) at Caffe Piccolo
Welcome home a native son … graduate of Waccamaw High School and a precocious art, lit and film student who used to visit the chocolate shop next door to Art Works when it was home to the Moveable Feast and so much more for 20+ years. These days, Zackary Vernon is a writer and scholar based in Boone, NC, an Associate Professor of English at Appalachian State University. His work has appeared in a range of magazines and journals, including "The Bitter Southerner," "Carolina Quarterly," and "Southern Cultures," and he received the Alex Albright Creative Nonfiction Prize from the "North Carolina Literary Review." In his debut novel, a Southern teenager struggles to understand his gender and sexuality amongst a conservative, religious family, but he finds comfort in the writings of Walt Whitman and support from a cast of eccentric small-town characters. Our Bodies Electric is a coming-of-age story (“Poignant and comic,” says Ron Rash, the acknowledged arbiter of quality Southern writing) that celebrates the exuberance of youth, the individual quest for sexual identity, and the joy of finding connections in the most unexpected of places.
$35
CLASS
Wednesday 06/19/2024 at 11:00 AM
Margaret Seidler, author, and John W. Jones, artist
(“Payne-ful” Business: Charleston's Journey to Truth) at Litchfield Country Club
This recent release coincided with an exhibit at the Charleston City Gallery displaying the original artwork created by Jones to illustrate the shocking discovery of ancestral ties by Seidler, a native and eighth generation Charlestonian. Instead of the medical genetic markers that were her object, the author discovered her Payne ancestors' bustling slave brokerage business on Broad Street, which supported the city's deep-seated and undeniable role in promoting the economic system of slavery. "'Payne-ful' Business: Charleston's Journey to Truth" follows Margaret Seidler's mission to learn and process her family's genealogical past. Using extensive research and personal experience, Seidler discusses the realities of Charleston's racial history while highlighting the historians, journalists, and community members who work to reconcile those truths. The book features authentic, historic slave advertisements brought to life by vivid paintings by artist John W. Jones (previously acclaimed for his pioneering book, "Confederate Currency, the Color of Money") that uncover the humanity hidden beneath the detached advertisement descriptions. Never has anyone taken the stilted, chattel-based text of human beings advertised for sale or rent and redefined them into living, conscious individuals depicting both their humanity and poignant familial relationships. Seidler hopes that acknowledging a more complete truth about our past will motivate us to bridge today's racial divide.
$35
CLASS
Wednesday 06/26/2024 at 11:00 AM
Lee G. Brockington
(Pawleys Island: Stories from the Porch) at Pawleys Plantation
More than two decades after the Pawleys Island Civic Association published this treasured book of memories and years after the passing of many of the 40 stories' authors, a new edition – with an updated introductory note and island history by contributing author and book editor Lee G. Brockington; fresh nostalgic photos from the extensive collection PICA contributed to the Georgetown County Library Archives; and a heartwarming new cover painting by artist Maura Kenny – is available to become your treasured book of porch stories. As "Walter Edgar's Journal" recounted: "Nature is a dominant presence in almost every single account. For most, one of the greatest attractions is the benevolent landscape – ocean, sand, sun, and marsh. You need to understand that this island is not simply a vacation spot. It is an experience. In today's busy world where people resort to aroma therapy and other fads in an attempt to relax and unwind, those who get to Pawleys need no treatment. Just being on the island is enough to rejuvenate an obsessed workaholic. Screen porches are still the location of choice for reading, napping, visiting, and swapping tales. Despite Hugo and beachfront development, Pawleys is still Pawleys. It is a place; it is a lifestyle; it is memorable; 'it's still glorious.'"
$35
CLASS
Tuesday 07/09/2024 at 11:00 AM
Robert Elder
(Calhoun: American Heretic) at Quigley’s Next Door
A new biography of the intellectual father of Southern secession — the man who set the scene for the Civil War, and whose political legacy still shapes America today. John C. Calhoun is among the most notorious and enigmatic figures in American political history. First elected to Congress in 1810, Calhoun went on to serve as secretary of war and vice president. But he is perhaps most known for arguing in favor of slavery as a "positive good" and for his famous doctrine of "state interposition," which laid the groundwork for the South to secede from the Union — and arguably set the nation on course for civil war. Calhoun has catapulted back into the public eye in recent years, as some observers connected the strain of radical politics he developed to the tactics and extremism of the modern Far Right, and as protests over racial injustice have focused on his legacy. In this revelatory biographical study, historian Robert Elder shows that Calhoun is even more broadly significant than these events suggest, and that his story is crucial for understanding the political climate in which we find ourselves today. By excising Calhoun from the mainstream of American history, he argues, we have been left with a distorted understanding of our past and no way to explain our present. Clemson and Emory educated, Elder is an associate professor at Baylor University whose research focuses on the cultural, intellectual, and religious history of the American South in the 19th century. His first book examined the influence of honor culture on evangelical religion in the early 19th century South, and linked this interaction to the origins and progress of modern identity in the region. His second book examines the life and thought of one of the country's most controversial historical figures, South Carolina Senator John C. Calhoun.
$35
CLASS
Thursday 07/18/2024 at 11:00 AM
Kimberly McCreight
(Like Mother, Like Daughter) at Pawleys Tap House & Grill
Kimberly McCreight's newest "shocking, propulsive, gripping, bingeable" novel is a thrilling work of emotional suspense that questions the damaging fictions we cling to and the hard truths we avoid. Above all, it's a love story between a mother and a daughter, each determined to save the other before it's too late. The New York Times bestselling author of seven novels – with nominations for Edgar, Anthony, and Alex Awards, Entertainment Weekly’s Favorite Book of the Year, and a TV option by HBO for "Reconstructing Amelia"; and Best Book of the Summer by the New York Times, People, and Publishers Weekly, Amazon Best Mystery of the Month, and a TV adaptation coming soon from Amazon and Nicole Kidman's Blossom Films for "A Good Marriage" – McCreight's last book, "Friends Like These," was named a Good Morning America Buzz Pick, an Amazon Best Book of the Month, and will be adapted for TV by Amblin Television. All indications are that Kimberly's new book will enjoy a similar fate!
$35
CLASS
Tuesday 07/23/2024 at 11:00 AM
Quitman Marshall
(Swampitude: Escapes with the Congaree) at Caffe Piccolo
A song of praise for swamps and twice a finalist for the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Book Prize, "Swampitude" is a meditation on the nature of this terrain, its meaning, its mystery, its fearfulness, its shelter, and its healing power. The book celebrates the survival, the stories, and the continuance of swamps in general, and a particular swamp, the Congaree in the center of South Carolina, which has been designated a United Nations Biosphere Reserve and is now Congaree National Park. Marshall tells stories that intersect with swamp-linked lives, making literature of the place, a place in the middle into which things flow and come out changed. Born in South Carolina, Quitman Marshall grew up in the swamp. He has published five books of poetry, including "You Were Born One Time" (2014), which won the SC Poetry Archives Book Prize. A winner of the Writers Exchange Award sponsored by Poets and Writers, Inc., and the founding coordinator of the Literary Series at the Spoleto Festival, USA, he lives in Beaufort, SC, with his family where he works as a writer, editor, translator, and teacher. Photography for the book is the work of Peggy Peattie, a multiple award-winning photo-journalist for The State.
$35
CLASS
Contact | ©2024 CLASS